Weird Foods The Pilgrims Thought Were Aphrodisiacs

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Back in Colonial Times, our ancestors had traveled a long way to start fresh in the New World. Aside from all of the grueling work and the hardships of daily life at the time, there had to be some downtime to bring forth the next generation. Even the Puritans had their ways of getting in the mood, and making procreation more enjoyable, as wacky as those methods were. Here are some of the weird foods the Pilgrims thought were aphrodisiacs.

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Pumpkin Pie

Pumpkin spiced anything is all the rage right now, but the old Thanksgiving dessert was thought to raise the “hopes” of the menfolk. It was thought that the smell of pumpkin brings sensual arousal to men, which then leads to the birth of a nation. Time to break out the Cool Whip.
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Ants

Talk about Ants in your pants! Based upon the historical belief that the Leaf Cutter Ant was an aphrodisiac, the pilgrims thought to look to the Carpenter Ant as their equivalent (which, historically, would then make them itches in thy britches). They are very high in protein and were thought to heighten sexual arousal when eaten. Mm, mm… so that’s what a “Plymouth Rock Leaf Cutter” is.
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Lizard Flesh

This belief started in Roman Times, and was still pushed as true in the time that our shoe-buckle wearing ancestors were reaping what they sowed behind closed doors. This smallish, leaf-eating lizard’s skin, feet, and even its urine, were thought to summon forth a man’s sexual prowess.
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Oysters

Oysters were pretty much always thought to be an aphrodisiac, and in Colonial Times, it was no different. These sea-faring males were sure of that idea, which kept them going down, over and over again, to snatch these clam-like beauties, which they then shared with their loving spouses.
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Walnuts

Walnuts were thought to have arousal-enhancing qualities for both sexes. For the Colonial male, just the mere act of cracking a nut gave the feeling of virility and power. While the Colonial female generally didn’t break the nuts during their ritual, she benefited from the rich oils and proteins locked within to enhance her libido.
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Carrots

Harvested carrots were plentiful, and they were also prone to giving both sexes a blushing of the cheeks. Aside from the obvious phallic nature of the root, eating carrots is good for the eyesight, which helped enhance the sexual experience, given their primitive light sources.
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Beans

Dried beans were also plentiful during Colonial Times, and according to a Roman physician named Galen, were to be considered an aphrodisiac. The thought process, now, stick with us on this one, was that any food that was “windy” or caused gas, would also help inflate the penis. We thought we’d just leave that right there for you.
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Beer

Beer was as common a drink as was water in the colony, and because it was brewed, it was also safer to drink. The brew was thought to enhance a man’s prowess and performance with a woman (like, since forever) and it was also easier to skim off the head of a beer than it was to skin a lizard for its potency. In the end, even if it wasn’t truly an aphrodisiac, at least you wouldn’t wind up with scurvy.
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Whale Guts

Whale hunting was very, very popular back in the “day”, and every part of the mammoth was used to good purpose. One of the side benefits from these friends, was the the potent level of an aphrodisiac contained in their bellies. Since these Colonials consumed all of what they caught, the guts of the beasts were found to produce an odor, much like perfume, in the fairer of the pilgrims. These fragrant emissions were thought to be especially effective when extracted from the innards of the Humpback or the Sperm whale. Oh. So THAT’S how they got those funny names…
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